Center for Professional and Continuing Education

Center for Professional and Continuing Education

Relevant | On-Demand | Affordable | Approved

NCU, Center for Professional and Continuing Education (CPCE) offers affordable courses, certificates, and webinars on cutting-edge professional development topics taught by leading practitioners.

As an approved sponsor for mental health professionals, registered nurses, and other specialists, CPCE offers a diverse selection of courses that meet licensing and professional development needs. Professionals can learn about the latest diagnostic tools and therapeutic approaches for issues that clients face or explore clinical areas in-depth to enhance their professional expertise.

NCU, Center for Professional and Continuing Education is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Northcentral University Extension maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC) approved continuing education provider status is pending application and approval.

The American Psychological Association (APA and National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC) are recognized organizations by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) as approved agencies for continuing education (CE) providers.

NCU, Center for Professional and Continuing Education is a California Board of Registered Nursing Continuing Education Provider (License number 17350).


Core Services

  1. Required Courses:
    CPCE offers courses that fulfill the mandatory California State Licensing Board requirements for psychologists, MFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs, and LEPs.

  2. Supervision Courses:
    The clinical supervision courses offered through CPCE cover all the information you need to supervise pre-licensed mental health providers including social workers, MFTs, and psychologists. Designed to provide students with flexible options, our courses cover a variety of topics including basic skills, legal and ethical issues, cross-cultural needs and difficult situations. Choose one or more courses based on your particular needs.

  3. Online Courses – Self-Contained / Self-Paced:
    CPCE is pleased to offer a variety of online courses that meet licensing requirements and provide the opportunity to explore current topics in the mental health field from the comfort of your office or home. Our online courses are self-contained and self-paced. All online courses are accessible at any time, and all course information is provided in an engaging and interactive delivery model.

CPCE Online Course Descriptions


CE Credit: 15 Hours
APA, BBS, BRN
$315

Effective clinicians must have good working knowledge of the issues surrounding substance abuse. This introductory level course will teach participants how to take a thorough drug and alcohol history, conduct a bio-psychosocial assessment, determine the stage of the problem, and make an appropriate referral for treatment when the problem is outside their scope of practice. Explore substance abuse assessment, treatment, and relapse issues, as well as prevention of future problems.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the background of society’s historical responses to abuse and addiction
  • Identify the role denial plays in the assessment, intervention, and treatment process and develop appropriate strategies to address this
  • Describe the probable effects of chemical dependency of the family system and appropriately engage the family in the identification, intervention, and treatment process
  • Describe the basic approaches to identification, intervention, and treatment of chemical dependency
  • Describe the importance of the 12 Step programs in the recovery process for both the chemically dependent and their families
  • Identify the salient issues involved in chemical dependency treatment as they relate to issues of gender, lifestyle, culture, and life span
  • Describe case management principles, techniques, and standards of practice for the treatment of chemical dependency
  • Utilize the development model of recovery in social and/or medical settings
  • Apply the essential elements of chemical dependency case management in assessment practices, treatment planning, progress documentation, discharge, and aftercare planning

Instructor:
Rena M. Palloff, Ph.D., LCSW has consulted extensively in health care, academic settings, and addiction treatment for well over 20 years. She is faculty at the Fielding Graduate Institute, in the Educational Leadership and Change Program and also in the masters’ degree program in Organizational Behavior/Organization Development. She is also adjunct faculty at Capella University in the School of Human Services. Additionally, she has taught classes on organizational behavior and management and leadership on an adjunct basis for the International Studies Program at Ottawa University in Ottawa, Kansas in various sites throughout the Pacific Rim. Dr. Palloff received a Bachelors Degree in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Masters Degree in Social Work from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She holds a Masters Degree in Organizational Development and a Ph.D. in Human and Organizational Systems from The Fielding Graduate Institute. Dr. Palloff is a managing partner of Crossroads Consulting Group, working with institutions, organizations, and corporations interested in the development of online distance learning and training programs and co-author of the 1999 Frandson Award winning book Building Learning Communities in Cyberspace: Effective Strategies for the Online Classroom (Jossey-Bass, 1999), Lessons from the Cyberspace Classroom (Jossey-Bass, 2001), The Virtual Student (Jossey-Bass, 2003), and Collaborating Online: Learning Together in Community (Jossey-Bass, 2005).


CE Credit: 15 Hours
APA, BBS, BRN
$315

This introductory level course is divided into 7 modules covering the following topics: BBS and BOP laws and regulations; creating and maintaining positive and effective supervision working relationships; evaluating and terminating with supervisees; managing difficult situations with supervisees; legal and ethical issues in clinical supervision; addressing vicarious traumatization; and a literature review of current research and interventions to address cross-cultural issues that may arise in supervision.

Learning Objectives:

  • Apply the laws and regulations of how to structure and provide supervision to ASWs, MFT interns and trainees, and psychology interns and assistants
  • Assess supervisees skill levels and learning styles in order to make supervision plans
  • Distinguish the line between supervision and psychotherapy
  • Prepare supervisees for clinically appropriate termination with clients
  • Develop a group supervision model
  • Develop strategies to prevent and address higher levels of supervisee anxiety
  • Develop intervention alternatives to use in addressing difficult situations in supervision
  • Describe the research findings on cross-cultural and multicultural issues in supervision
  • Assess and reduce your level of liability risk

Instructor:
Rachel Michaelsen, LCSW, Diplomate – Comprehensive Energy Psychology, has been studying and utilizing Energy Psychology (EP) Techniques since 1999. She has taught clinicians and lay people how to utilize these techniques at agencies and conferences including the Association of Comprehensive Energy Psychology and the Canadian Association for Integrative and Energy Therapies. She is also a CAMFT -certified supervisor with a certificate in Advanced Clinical Supervision from Smith College School for Social Work. She has supervised paraprofessionals, graduate students, MFTs, ASWs and supervisors since 1996 and has taught courses in supervision at JFKU, NASW, CAMFT, Smith College and many agencies since 2000. Ms. Michaelsen maintains a private practice in Oakland where she uses EP techniques to address a variety of issues including PTSD, stress, anxiety and depression. Rachel holds a Masters in Social Work from the Smith College School for Social Work.


CE Credit: 6 Hours
APA, BBS, BRN
$159

Supervisors have ethical responsibilities to supervisees, clients, and the profession, and are guided by laws regarding client care and employment. This course provides legal and ethical information to supervisors working in mental health and social-services settings. Topics include: ethics of supervision, laws that impact supervisors and supervisees, mandatory reporting issues, documentation, liability risk and risk prevention, ethical expectations of supervisees, hiring and firing, and dual relationships. Material will be covered through lecture, discussion, and vignettes. This course fulfills BBS requirements for 6 hours of training in supervision and in law and ethics.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain their ethical responsibilities as supervisors
  • Apply laws regarding mandatory reporting to teaching and mentoring supervisees
  • Demonstrate skill in documenting supervision
  • Apply legal and ethical guidelines regarding hiring, progressive discipline, and firing of supervisees
  • Assess their level of liability risk
  • Explain to supervisees how to follow ethical supervisee practices
  • Identify when to avoid engaging in unethical dual relationships with supervisees

Instructor:
Rachel Michaelsen, LCSW, Diplomate – Comprehensive Energy Psychology, has been studying and utilizing Energy Psychology (EP) Techniques since 1999. She has taught clinicians and lay people how to utilize these techniques at agencies and conferences including the Association of Comprehensive Energy Psychology and the Canadian Association for Integrative and Energy Therapies. She is also a CAMFT -certified supervisor with a certificate in Advanced Clinical Supervision from Smith College School for Social Work. She has supervised paraprofessionals, graduate students, MFTs, ASWs and supervisors since 1996 and has taught courses in supervision at JFKU, NASW, CAMFT, Smith College and many agencies since 2000. Ms. Michaelsen maintains a private practice in Oakland where she uses EP techniques to address a variety of issues including PTSD, stress, anxiety and depression. Rachel holds a Masters in Social Work from the Smith College School for Social Work.


CE Credit: 6 Hours
APA, BBS, BRN
$159

The purpose of this online workshop is to give an initial update on changes in ethics and legal standards, and then to provide an opportunity for MHPs to consider particularly thorny ethical and legal issues. The course will assist mental health professionals in maintaining competence in making ethically and legally informed decisions, and help participants better manage the complexities of mental health practice. The course will be taught at an intermediate level, and is appropriate for currently licensed professionals. It meets and exceeds the Board of Psychology's mandated 4-hour ethics and law update requirement, and meets the Board of Behavioral Science’s mandated 6-hour ethics and law update requirement.

Learning Objectives:

  • Provide an update on changes in ethics codes and laws in the past few years related to mental health practice
  • Provide a model for solving ethical-legal dilemmas in everyday mental health practice
  • Discuss and problem solve areas related to complex ethical/legal situations

Instructor:
Daniel O. Taube, J.D., Ph.D., earned his J.D. from Villanova University in 1985 and his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Hahnemann University in 1987, as a member of the Hahnemann/Villanova Joint Psychology and Law Graduate Program. His areas of professional focus include ethical and legal issues in professional practice, child protection, and addictions. In addition to his teaching and research interests, he has been in private practice since 1990, has served on the APA Ethics Appeals Panel for over 20 years, and taught graduate and professional level courses on ethical and legal issues in professional practice for 25 years. Dr. Taube regularly consults with a wide range of practitioners and community agencies regarding standards of practice and ethical concerns.


CE Credit: 6 Hours
APA, BBS, BRN
$159

Climate scientists estimate that 200 million Americans will be touched by significant psychological distress from climate-related events in the upcoming years, and yet little attention is given to how to treat the profound mental health suffering that results from climate change. The U.N. sponsored Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reported that “The physical and economic destruction (of climate change) surely boggles the mind but what is not being addressed are the human psychological consequences of all this devastation.

And yet the contribution of the mental health field goes beyond coping, to being part of an interdisciplinary effort to mitigate and slow the progression of climate chaos. The field of psychology is powerful in:

  • Addressing the emotional underpinnings of climate denial and disavowal.
  • Understanding motivators for how people change.
  • Identifying the most effective communication strategies.
  • Building resiliency when individuals and communities are faced with immediate and long term climate chaos that provoke trauma, grief, anxiety and depression.
  • Promoting the therapeutic benefits of empowered participation and engagements in climate solutions.

This course will introduce comprehensive strategies and resources for mental health professionals, addressing key clinical themes specific to the psychological features and impact of climate change.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify key theoretical underpinnings of coping with the impact of climate change.
  • Prepare for effective treatment of climate disruption mental health symptoms in clinical practice.
  • Identify the growing relevance of climate change in psychotherapy.
  • List techniques for helping clients process emotions related to climate provoked anxiety, depression and grief and for building emotional resiliency.
  • Analyze a variety of ways to incorporate climate psychology perspectives into clinical practice.
  • Provide reputable resources for furthering competency in climate psychology.

Instructor:
Leslie Davenport, MFT is a licensed integrative psychotherapist, and climate psychology consultant, with offices in Tacoma WA, and the San Francisco Bay Area. She holds a Masters in Counseling Psychology from Dominican College. Leslie Davenport brings the role of psychology into interdisciplinary dialogues that advance creative and effective solutions to climate change. Leslie is a founding member of the Institute for Health & Healing, one of the nations’ first and largest hospital-based integrative medicine programs. Her 25 years of medical experience developing an empowering and collaborative approach to resolving crisis has informed her climate psychology model.



Coming Soon: Fall 2020 Courses!

  • Distanced-Based Therapy and Supervision
  • Increasing Awareness of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

To register and for more information, email extension@ncu.edu.

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