psychology

Developing Systems to Support Post-Incarcerated Women Who Suffer From Mental Illness to Re-Integrate into Society

As an NCU Kick-Starter Grant recipient, Patricia Zimmerman’s success came on the heels of some of the most challenging life circumstances. A former inmate of 17 years, Zimmerman had been imprisoned in three of New York’s toughest prisons for women inmates.

Using Psychology Principles to Motivate Your Students

Savvy teachers today make use of psychology to increase learning in the classroom. The American Psychological Association and the Coalition for Psychology in Schools and Education recently undertook a study to identify psychological principles that would be most beneficial in the PK-12 classroom. Both organizations have looked at how to put psychological science to work in education for more than a decade.

NCU Trailblazer Scholarship Recipient Pursues MA in Psychology

As a young gymnast, Melissa Hart had an interest in how the mind of an athlete works and admired those who could block out distractions to achieve a high level of concentration. As a Trailblazer scholarship recipient, Melissa is pursuing a Master of Arts in Psychology to teach athletes how to be more positive and focused, and feel more in control of themselves and their performances.

WILLPOWER vs. BRAIN POWER: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF RESOLUTIONS

By Rick Rapier

With the new year right around the corner, many people are considering or have made definitive resolutions for 2015. Most of us look at the new year as a clean slate and have every intention of sticking to the personal or professional changes we vow to make, so why is the idea of a resolution inspiring yet hellish at the same time? As Samuel Johnson (ca. 1775) said, “Hell is paved with good intentions.” So what is it about human nature that we make promises to ourselves to change, promises that we want to keep – but suspect we won’t?

From Happy to “Hangry”: The Psychology of Food

By Rick Rapier

We all know that certain foods can change our moods. It’s been widely reported that chocolate can simulate feelings of love, and every holiday party attendee knows that alcohol tends to reduce inhibitions. But is there more to food and the mind than temporary changes to blood sugar?

Career Q&A with Dr. Diane Hamilton

D HamiltonDiane Hamilton (Ph.D., Business Administration, 2008) is an alumna with more than 25 years of business and management-related experience in software, pharmaceuticals, corporate training, finance, and real estate.